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New Inventions I Would Like To See



New Inventions I Would Like To See


Here are some new inventions I would like to see. Perhaps some reader of this article can take these ideas and make them work. Good Luck!

new inventions, inventions, new ideas

Do you want to create money-making new inventions? Not me. I just like to dream them up. Here are some of the new ideas I would love to see created in reality. I hope a reader or two will do something with them.


New Inventions For Outdoors


Free-standing tents without poles: The idea here is to have two inflatable sleeves that criss-cross over the top of a dome-style tent. Perhaps the rigidity would be insufficient for windy nights, but it's worth a try. Make them inflatable from inside, and you could quickly crawl inside and out of the rain to inflate it.


Rail-runner bicycle attachment: This is a new invention I want to try, but one that will not be popular with the railroad companies. Wouldn't it be great to be able to bike along train tracks? They go many places that roads don't go. The idea here is a device that holds the bicycle wheels on the track as you pedal along. Easy removal would be necessary, of course, for the occasional passing of a train.


Kites inflated with helium: If its been done, I haven't seen them yet. With some lift from the helium, these kites could be flown in any amount of wind. Designed right, they would still fly something like a kite, and with more maneuverability if designed like a stunt kite, with two strings. The first prototype might be a kite with a small helium balloon attached. If somebody makes this, I'll buy one. 


Other New Inventions


Disposable t-shirts: Dollar stores have t-shirts on the shelves, so we know they're getting cheap. Why not invented a line of shirts that are low-quality, but good enough, and cost very little to manufacture? Sell them in boxes of 12, as "disposable clothing." Where's the market? Those who want less laundry to do on long trips, or those who want to have some cheap things to wear while doing dirty jobs.


Fast-food tube: These could be like the tubes at bank drive-throughs, but they would have to stay level for the sake of the drinks. Using these, one slow person won't hold up the whole line at the drive-through, because there can be several lines. The customers send money in through this conveyor system, and get food back the same way. Just pull up to whichever lane is empty. I'm waiting to see this invention.


Magnetic painting kits: This new novelty invention would consist of a flat "canvas" of magnetic material (steel?), and an assortment of many colors of iron dust or small shavings. Just apply the metal dust carefully to create any "painting" you can imagine. It would be something like a Buddhist sand mandala, but slightly more permanent. Spray the finished painting with a "fixer," and you could even hang it on the wall.


Invisible walls: This is a new invention that would be just plain fun. Make a wall with properly placed cameras, using the other side of the wall was the projection screen for these cameras, and the effect would be that of looking right into the other room - an invisible wall. I'm not sure about the practical applications, but an "invisible ceiling" would provide a nice view at night.


Magnetic signs for windows: Thousands of businesses use large magnetic signs for their vehicles, with their company name and logo on them. Of course these can only be used on metallic surfaces. To stick to car or building windows, they need a similar flat magnet or steel mesh material that is placed on the other side of the glass, to hold them in place. This may be one of those "unpatentable" ideas, but the first to trademark a catchy name and market them widely might do well with new inventions like these.



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