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Relaxing Guided Tours of Ireland

 



Relaxing Guided Tours of Ireland


For families interested in traveling to Europe, consider one of the guided tours offered by several outfits that will take 

you and show you the best sights and sounds of Ireland.  Such vacations are often not very expensive when compared to the 

rest of Europe and family members of all ages will enjoy the scenery and attractions.

Most guided tours of Ireland will have you fly into Shannon.  This is a small airport on the western side of the island and 

it’s close to many attractions you’ll see.  Your first stop will be to the village of Adare, famous for its thatched roof 

cottages and quaint charm.  This is your first stop along the Dingle Peninsula, Ireland’s most beautiful natural area.  

You’ll see dramatic mountains, green fields and many archeological sites.

As for your next stop, guided tours of Ireland may take you to some of the sites or to a pub in the Dingle Peninsula.  You 

may choose to go dolphin-watching at specified places along the Peninsula road.  Soak up the beautiful scenery and eat some 

of the hearty local dishes.  After that, you’ll travel to Killarney and visit the Gap of Dunloe, a four mile gulch carved 

out by glaciers.  

Guided tours of Ireland would be remiss if they didn’t take you to the infamous Blarney Castle.  While much of the castle 

is in ruins and it doesn’t have a roof, visitors will be amazed by the ancient architecture and will be given a chance to 

kiss the Blarney Stone—a feat which is done while lying on your back.  Afterward, you’ll likely go to the picturesque town 

of Kinsdale, within County Cork.  Visit one of their gourmet restaurants and walk along the cobblestone streets.

The next logical stop for guided tours of Ireland is the town of Cobh, the departure point for many emigrants to the US and 

the last port of call for the Titanic.  Visit the local graveyard where many of the Titanic’s passengers are buried. From 

there, travel to the medieval town of Kilkenny, famous for its cathedrals and its history of witchcraft.  

Often, guided tours of Ireland will then bring you into Dublin where there are numerous sites to see, including the site of 

Ireland’s first Parliament and the famous Guinness Brewery.  Taste some of Ireland’s finest beer and stay at the Cabra 

Castle, complete with a golf course, gardens and beautiful walking paths.  

To get the most out of guided tours of Ireland, you’ll continue on to visit Carrick-on-Shannon, a scenic boating haven and 

Boyle, the site of some lovely abbey ruins.  After touring this area, you’ll likely move on to the County Mayo. In Mayo, 

you’ll walk the streets of Westport and see its seashore, dotted with a number of tiny islands.  Shop along the traditional 

Irish shops and take in the quaint nature of this lovely town.  

Guided tours of Ireland rarely miss Galway, the cultural capital of Ireland.  Take in some traditional Irish music by 

visiting one of the town’s several pubs.  After that, you’ll visit the Aran Islands, the place where the famous Irish Aran 

sweaters originally came from.  These islands will take you back in time as little has changed over the years. 

Most guided tours of Ireland will let you see and taste and listen to Ireland at every possible chance.  It’s a beautiful 

country with lovely people and it will be an experience you’ll never forget. 


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